You’ve entered the World of Dinosaurs the main segment of Ancient Beasts that displays detailed information on various dinosaur genera and species.

World of Dinosaurs

For centuries and as old as the tale of time, the world of dinosaurs has fascinated humankind. From their lengthy, strong teeth to their almighty claws, youth and adults alike have loved these ancient reptiles. We’ve seen them in books, movies, games, and so much more!

Finding a reliable source of information on dinosaurs is extremely challenging. For the most part, you’ll see random details on a museum site or by paleontologists discussing their latest fossil discoveries. What’s missing is an online resource that holds everything you’d want to know about these beloved ancient beasts.

In the World of Dinosaurs, we want to make sure we rectify this issue. Here, we’ll attempt to cover as many species as possible, from the famous to those that are less known. Not only can you read more about these magnificent creatures, but we’ll attempt to cover as much as possible for student assignments or academic achievements.

World of Dinosaurs
Sections

We’ve separated the content in World of Dinosaurs into different pages with the relevant articles pertaining to each one. Unlike most other sites, we don’t want to dump information onto Ancient Beasts and make it challenging for you to find them. In this way, you’ll know exactly where to go for the details you need.

Here are the dinosaur pages available and what each one contains:

The first dinosaur classification started in 1842, appearing when Sir Richard Owen proposed a suborder of Dinosauria, created specifically for Saurian reptiles as he called it. The taxonomy has grown over the years as more of these ancient beasts were discovered with the tables evolving over time.

While we intend to cover all of the species and families over time, we’re primarily going to update our live classification table as we cover content for each dinosaur. In this way, you can click on the links for each article and not divert to empty pages.

In the modern dinosaur classification, you’ll find two orders: Saurischia and Ornithischia. Each one has several suborders and infraorders with some divisions among them. The primary difference is in the design of the pelvis, with the former meaning lizard hips and the latter bird hips.

In this section of World of Dinosaurs, we’ll take a more detailed look at which families and species fall in each order. We’ll also see what the other major differences are and the paleontological aspects.

The next dinosaur classification area we’ll discuss is family. There are many suborders in these families, but you’ll have a better understanding of how the various genera and species fit together. We’ll also show you why they are classified together and which characteristics they share.

You won’t find small articles or guides here, as we plan on extensively breaking down dinosaur families among the various orders. We’ll show you the links between them, where they were mostly found, and where the family name originates from.

We’re almost at the juicy bits. With dinosaur genera, we’ll study each genus per family, showing you why the various species are grouped together. For example, you may know about Tyrannosaurus Rex as the main species of that genus, but did you know they suspect there are others?

In this section, we’re going to go into heavy scientific detail for each genus, explaining what sets them apart from others. We’ll go into paleobiology, genus descriptions, and so much more!

Here’s the section you’ve all been waiting for. We know how much people love reading through the various dinosaur species, and we’ve been just as eager to deliver this content for you. We’ll start small, but you’ll notice how much we have to say as time goes by.

Also, you won’t only find popular species here. We’re going to cover the lesser-known ones too and show you what makes them so fascinating. We’ll also have some stats about them, such as when they were first discovered and where you can see their fossils today.